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Presentacion “The sociology of corporate responsibility in the online era: the case of MTV’s Staying Alive Campaigns” Dr. Cheryl Martens (Senior Lecturer de Bournemouth University, Media School).

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El Lunes 11 de Abril tendremos un nuevo seminario de prácticas culturales. Esta vez presentará Dr. Cheryl Martens (Senior Lecturer de Bournemouth University, Media School).

Su presentación lleva como título: “The sociology of corporate responsibility in the online era: the case of MTV’s Staying Alive Campaigns”  (Mas detalles  abajo de la imagen).

Hora: 15.00. Lugar: Sala de Consejo de Facultad de Ciencias Sociales UDP, Ejercito 333. A quienes estén interesados en asistir, porfavor confirmar asistencia a [email protected]

“The sociology of corporate responsibility in the online era: the case of MTV’s Staying Alive Campaigns” Dr. Cheryl Martens (Senior Lecturer de Bournemouth University, Media School).


Based on a study examining the production and reception of  MTV´s global HIV/AIDS campaigns, this paper examines the micro level of audience interactions with MTV campaigns and their intersection with organisational production and corporate social responsibility (CSR).  A main premise of the paper is that the audiences for HIV/AIDS campaign are becoming addressed less in terms of categories such as ´general public´ and ‘risk groups´ and are increasingly being viewed as ´market segments´.  As such audience are implicated in the production of global HIV/AIDS awareness messages via market research strategies and Web 2.0 and 3.0, potentially becoming active participants in campaigns via interactive digital communication.

The paper argues that the materiality of changing media in relation to audiences needs to be viewed according to  how boundaries are being maintained and/or challenged.  How information is framed by the CSR programming of MTV and used by audiences in terms of its material, tactile and spatial dimensions (Lash and Lury, 2007) will be discussed with a view to discussing how these changes may be contributing to new forms of media sociality, which involve more reflexive but also more limited participation in such campaigns.

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